Things You Should Know About Renal Colic

Published: 25th August 2009
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Renal colic is a type of pain that can be commonly caused by developing kidney stones. The pain usually starts around the kidney area or somewhere below it and can radiate through the flank until the pain reaches the bladder. The pain can be colicky in nature which means that it can come in irregular waves or intervals as opposed to being a steady continuous pain feeling.

Renal colic may come in two types: dull and acute. The acute type of renal colic is particularly the most unpleasant and has been described by sufferers as one of the strongest pain sensations felt. The pain may also depend on the type and size of the kidney stone or stones that move through the urinal tract. Depending on the situation, the pain may at times be stronger in the renal or bladder area or it can be equally strong in both. Larger stones may require medical intervention for their removal in order to get rid of the pain associated with it.

Renal colic also shows some particular signs and symptoms that can help alert the individual as well as the doctor. These symptoms usually refer to the different types symptoms experienced by patients as studied. Some may or may not be experienced by the patient and all of the symptoms may not even be evident which depend on the current condition of the patient.

Some patients of renal colic may experience severe urinary pain. They may also have difficulty passing urine due to the kidney stones blocking the path. Patients may also fell waves of pain coming from the back and radiating to the abdomen, genitals and thighs. Pain in the small of the back can also be experienced. Renal colic may also be associated with symptoms such as nausea and vomiting.

Renal colic patients may also show signs of having a swollen abdomen that may be causing the intense pain being felt. Other renal colic symptoms that have been observed by doctors include fever and chills. Serious symptoms of renal colic may also include blood being found in the urine which may show that the kidney stones may already have wounded parts of the urinary tract.

In most cases, renal colic may go away on its own. Most of the small stones in the kidney or bladder easily pass spontaneously through the urinary tract and may be discharged naturally. In such cases, only pain management for renal colic is required. In order to relieve this type of pain, a strong Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, also commonly known as NSAID can be used. NSAID's are known to provide better pain relief than most opiate-based medication.

There are also other ways of dealing with the pain associated with renal colic. Trying to lie down on the non-aching side of the body and applying a hot water bottle or towel into the area affected by the pain may greatly help ease some of the pain. If the pain caused by renal colic is not that intense, frequent walking may help result in a more speedy release of the stones.

But if the kidney stones have become too large to effectively pass through naturally, surgery to remove them may be required. If not, patients may continue to feel the recurring pain which may not be relieved effectively by other measures.

Read about protein for women, spleen pain and other information at the Health And Nutrition Tips website.

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